Mittwoch, 4. September 2013

Herman Dune - Mariage à Mendoza

















Irgendwie ist diese Veröffentlichung genau so an mir vorbei gerauscht, wie der silberne Wagen auf dem Plattencover: "Mariage à Mendoza" ist der Soundtrack von Herman Dune zum gleichnamigen Film des Regisseurs Edouard Deluc und erschien bereits Anfang des Jahres auf CD, im Mai folgte auch die Veröffentlichung auf Vinyl.

Herman Dune hält sich hier auf bekannten und geschätzten Wegen zwischen Folk und Rock. So hätten Songs wie "The Wrong Button", "Holding A Monument", "The Great Escape" und "Don't Lie To Me" auch auf einem regulären Album gut Platz finden können. Doch bei insgesamt 20 Titeln, von denen sechs unter der 1-Minuten-Marke bleiben, einige mehrmals in unterschiedlichen Versionen ("The Great Escape", "Brothers"), nur instrumental oder schlicht mit der akustischen Gitarre dargeboten werden, ist klar, dass auch in die ein oder andere Einbahnstraße oder Sackgasse eingebogen wird. 

Hört man "Mariage à Mendoza", so glaubt man zwischen Kastagnetten und Mariachi-Sounds zunächst, dass sich Herman Dune auf einem Mexiko-Trip befindet. Doch dann muss man sich geographisch ein wenig neu orientieren, wenn man erfährt, dass der Film in Argentinien spielt.             



Herman Dune’s new album, Mariage a Mendoza, starts off as the opening to a Robert Rodriguez film – with a driving and gritty sounding electric guitar in the back of the very same silver car pictured on the cover of the album.

It continues in the same emerging pattern as the soundtrack to a Mexican Mariachi film that you would like to see. There are clear references to the legendary Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, both in vocals, tempo and slow-rock groove. But at the same time Mendoza sparks a feel of the Mexican Riviera with For Brothers guitar solo and Holding a Monument.

However, Mariage a Mendoza is not the soundtrack to a mariachi film, but rather a French comedy taking place in Argentina. The cinematic trivia though is unimportant when concerned with the quality of the album, as the music speaks for itself and is a complete journey all on its own. You can set your own film in your minds eye.

In addition, like Tom Petty, Herman Dune never fails to create a slow-rock album that you can dance to. Sweaty, raw and enticing, much like a glass of Tequila, with a rattlesnake tooth in the glass, which you empty at an old western bar in the cactus desert. Vocals are heavy, breathing into the microphone and almost panting out the words over dribbling and sensuous guitar riffs.

With songs like Escape to the Moon and Silver Galaxy Escape you can hear influences from such artists as Neil Young and Nick Drake. The extensive guitar solos are reminiscent of Neil Young’s album Le Noise. The vivid experimentation with loops, noise, distortion, reverb and melodic parts combined; tie Herman Dune in with these masters of rock and anti-folk.

The album is well put together, with just enough variation to keep you interested. Following through from start to finish, Mendoza takes you on a ride in a silver bullet across the Arizona desert and into Mexico, and all the way to Guadalajara. And you never want to look back.
(altrocklive)

2 Kommentare:

Ingo hat gesagt…

7,5 Punkte

Dirk hat gesagt…

Die gesungenen Titel sind toll wie immer, der Rest, naja, ...

6 Punkte